Breastfeeding and returning to work

You have just spent anywhere from 2-6 months (maybe more) at home with your new baby.  If you are breastfeeding, you have likely spent much of this time trying to figure out the whole process of nursing.  Not an easy task for some.  Now you may be returning to work, and, as you may have already discovered, there is now a whole new learning curve as you figure out how you can continue breastfeeding while also being apart from your baby for several hours during the day.  This week’s post will hopefully provide some answers to one of the big questions asked throughout the sessions of The Chicago New Moms Group:  I’m going back to work and I want to continue breastfeeding. How do I do this?

A big thank you to Kathy Lipke, board certified lactation consultant of Lactation Partners for the following helpful information about planning your return to work. Another excellent resource for further information can be found on the Medela website.  Check it out!

Many women who return to work continue to breastfeed their baby when at home and pump and offer bottles when they’re at work. It will require a commitment to spend the time planning. This is how the planning might “look” for you:

  • Is your workplace “breastfeeding friendly”? (See IL Breastfeeding law.) Do they have a dedicated room where you can go to pump?
  • Have you talked to your boss about the breaks you’ll need to take in order to pump? (often a mid morning, lunch and mid afternoon session)
  •  Do you know someone else at work who is in the same situation? Ask them how they managed.
  •  Do you have a good quality electric pump? A double pump is often the fastest and easiest as you will be able to pump both breasts at the same time.
  • A second set of pump parts is helpful if you don’t have a good place to go to clean your parts after pumping or your time is limited.
  • You’ll need some dish soap, a bottle brush, paper towels for drying and a refrigerator to store the pumped milk (a cooler will also work). There are lots of other supplies you can purchase to help with the cleaning and storage.
  • Try to be consistent with pumping time and frequency; always pump into clean breast shields and bottles.
  • Breastfeed the baby when you’re home, before work, after work, at bedtime and on weekends. This will help both of you to continue to maintain the closeness you’ve spent so much time developing over the previous weeks.

There are many questions and concerns that come with new parenthood. Take everything in slowly, be realistic, rest often, take care of yourself physically and emotionally, connect with family and friends and enjoy every minute of this new and exciting journey!

Kathy Lipke is a registered nurse and board certified lactation consultant. She has been practicing as a consultant for 24 years providing in-home lactation and new family support. She and her husband Bob are the proud parents of two wonderful daughters, both of whom she breastfed. Her practice covers most of the city of Chicago and the northern suburbs. Her commitment is to support new families as they transition into parenthood.


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